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Major County Improvements Being Made Without Debt


Hunterdon County owns and operates numerous facilities across the county necessary for providing services to the public and the Board of Commissioners' conservative fiscal philosophy assures that maintaining these facilities is achieved without county debt.


No Debt Policy Aids Tax Rate Freeze

The no debt policy since 2014 is an important component in the Board’s ability to freeze the county tax rate for the last five consecutive years. The Board has an obligation to the public to ensure maintenance of assets.

2023 Hunterdon County Commissioner Board
No County Debt Since 2014

Through cost benefit analyses various infrastructure improvements and repairs are scheduled and prioritized within strict budgetary restraints and a pay as you go policy for capital expenditures. Some examples of recently approved projects include improvements to the roof at the Communications Center on Cherryville Road in Franklin, the removal of underground fuel tanks at the Route 12 complex and their replacement with above ground tanks, replacement of flooring at the Senior Center, and improvements at the Deer Path Park Pavilion.

The then Hunterdon County Board of Freeholders ended the practice of putting the taxpayers in debt in 2014.

These are all standard maintenance projects necessary to protect facility assets. These projects are in addition to major on-going projects, including the rehabilitation of the Historic Courthouse, construction of a new Polytech school facility, and the upgrade at the Emergency Services Training Complex where firefighters and first responders are trained. All being accomplished without debt.


As a current member of the Board’s Budget Committee, I am committed to working with my colleagues to ensure the continuance of that practice, which we have done for eight consecutive years.


Farmland and open space preservation are major factors in keeping Hunterdon County as one of the best places to live.


Hunterdon County’s successful efforts to preserve farmland (over 36,000 acres preserved) and open space (over 9000 acres preserved) is a significant achievement and continues to be a major priority for my Board of Commissioners colleagues and me, which is why another 108.4 acres have been added to the preservation rolls so far in 2023.


Hunterdon County’s successful efforts to preserve farmland (over 36,000 acres preserved) and open space (over 9000 acres preserved) is a significant achievement and continues to be a major priority for my Board of Commissioners colleagues and me, which is why another 108.4 acres have been added to the preservation rolls so far in 2023.


I have found, as an advocate of land preservation from my time on the Tewksbury Township Committee, through my nearly six years on the County Board, that the key to success is working collaboratively with partners; our municipalities, land preservation non-profits, the State, and, of course, willing landowners.


Having funding partners helps to ensure the County’s Open Space fund can be spread further for future preservation projects.


Protecting Waterways


2023 preservation projects include the 15 acres Beitz property in Readington and Raritan Townships which was closed in August. Partners with the County included the Hunterdon Land Trust, NJ Conservation Foundation, Raritan Headwaters, Readington and Raritan Townships and the State Green Acres program.



Part of that project will include the decommissioning of a dam structure with the intention that the opening up of the a portion of the South Branch to allow the shad to move upriver to Clinton. An additional 4.2 acres was preserved in Raritan Township through a County Open Space grant to the Hunterdon Land Trust for the acquisition of the Schwenderman property which assists in the protection of the Plum Brook. The County also awarded an Open Space Grant to D&R Greenway, to preserve the 12.5 acre Sutphin/Apgar properties, in East Amwell Township.


Recently the Board approved Open Space Grants to the Hunterdon Land Trust, for the preservation of 14.4 acres of the Lipka property, and to the New Jersey Conservation Foundation, to preserve 12 acres at the Holland property, both in Raritan Township. The 50+ acre Saums Farm in Readington 50.3390 Acres has been preserved with the County, the State Agriculture Development Committee, and the municipality contributing.


Most of the acreage was auctioned in May as a preserved farm in perpetuity.


Volunteers On POSAC and CADB Play Key Roles


The volunteer members of the County Parks and Recreation Open Space Advisory Committee (POSAC) and County Agricultural Development Board (CADB) play significant roles in vetting and recommending properties for preservation. Their dedication is most appreciated.


Upcoming Events in Hunterdon County


Whether you are planning to enjoy a beautiful fall day at one of the County's many parks, or looking to dispose of Hazardous materials. There are many upcoming events and service days for residents to take advantage of.









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